Archived Webinars

Aging and I/DD: Planning for Growing Older

Date: Tuesday, September 26, 2017

As we grow older, we should continue to grow and develop our skills and interests, and we can continue to live well, happily, and healthfully. But, getting older also creates challenges that we should plan for. These challenges may include staying active and engaged, paying our expenses when we stop working, and addressing changes in body and mind. In addition, people should plan for how decisions will be made in this part of life and make sure that they have the skills and support they need to age successfully.

In this webinar, Dr. Kathie Bishop will review the aging process and discuss what successful aging looks like for people with I/DD. Kathie will address planning and skill-building to support people with complex medical needs and adults with I/DD who experience cognitive or functioning loss, possibly related to dementia. Dr. Bishop will also describe how people with I/DD and their families can work together to advocate to and with health care professionals to make sure that they receive needed medical care and that their wishes are carried out.

Speaker Bio:

Kathleen M. Bishop, Ph.D. has over 40 years of experience in the developmental disabilities field and over 20 as a Gerontologist with a specialty in aging with developmental disabilities. She has a Bachelors and Master’s Degree in Special Education and a Ph.D. from Syracuse University in aging with disabilities.

Dr. Bishop works as a consultant for many organizations in the aging and IDD networks to assist with program and support planning as well as teaches at Utica College’s Gerontology program’s on-line courses including a course on aging with disabilities. She is retired from the University Of Rochester School Of Medicine and Dentistry as well as the New York State Office for People with Developmental Disabilities. She continues to present nationally and internationally on topics related to aging and developmental disabilities. Areas of expertise include environmental modifications and developmental disabilities, caregiving for adults with dementia and IDD, and women with disabilities.

Dr. Bishop is co-chair of the NTG Group T curriculum development committee. She has been an active member of the NTG since the inception and is a member of the NTG Steering Committee. Currently Dr. Bishop is presenting the 2-day NTG Dementia Capable Care for Adults with ID and Dementia around the US along with the Third Day Train-the-Trainer component.


Supported Decision-Making: Planning for Medical Decision-Making

Date: Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Because medical decisions often need to be made in stressful situations, involve complex information, and require weighing of significant risk, planning is important. There are many ways that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) can receive support to make decisions about the health care they want to receive.

In this webinar, Clarissa Kripke, MD, will discuss how doctors and other medical professionals can create an environment that empowers people with I/DD to make health care decisions using supported decision-making tools. Samantha Crane and Kelly Israel, attorneys at the Autistic Self Advocacy Network, will discuss the legal framework for supported decision-making in health care settings, how people with I/DD can use supported decision-making to have their preferences honored, how to build a network of supporters, and what agreements should be put in place before decisions need to be made.

About the Speakers:

  • Dr. Clarissa Kripke, MD, FAAFP is Director of the Office of Developmental Primary Care in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Kripke runs CART Services, an interdisciplinary mobile consult team. The CART Services team provides clinical consultation and technical assistance to build the capacity of the health care system to serve transition age youth and adults with developmental disabilities. The team applies neurodiversity and social model concepts to the practice of medicine.
  • Samantha Crane is Director of Public Policy at ASAN’s national office. A graduate of Harvard Law School, Samantha previously served as staff attorney at the Bazelon Center of Mental Health Law, focusing on enforcing the right to community integration as established by the Supreme Court in Olmstead v. L.C., and as an associate at Quinn Emanuel Urquhart, & Sullivan, L.L.P. From 2009 to 2010, Samantha served as law clerk to the Hon. Judge William H. Yohn at the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.
  • Kelly Israel is a Policy Analyst at ASAN’s national office. She, under Samantha Crane, works to advance the legal, legislative and administrative policy objectives of ASAN. She is a graduate of American University, Washington College of Law and served as student attorney in its Disability Rights Law Clinic. In that capacity, she was legal counsel for clients with disabilities in a wide variety of cases, including special education and ADA reasonable accommodations issues. She has also worked for other public interest organizations on the death penalty and on guardianship in the United States. Her chief interests are the education of children with disabilities, supported decision-making as a viable alternative to guardianship, and the over-criminalization of people with developmental disabilities.

Tips to Interact Effectively with Law Enforcement

Date: Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Speakers Leigh Ann Davis and Jessica Oppenheim will explore skills needed to engage effectively with law enforcement officers, the criminal justice system, and other authority figures as a witness, victim, or offender. This webinar will provide practical tips for people with I/DD, families, and professionals on how to support people with I/DD to advocate for themselves and engage with authority figures effectively.

About the Speakers:

  • Leigh Ann Davis, M.S.S.W., M.P.A., is Director of Criminal Justice Initiatives and in that role oversees The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability®. She has worked in the area of disability and justice issues since 1994 when hired by The Arc of the United States to direct a Department of Justice project of national significance educating criminal justice professionals about ADA accommodations. Since that time, she has authored numerous publications (curricula, guidebooks, fact sheets, scholarly articles) during her almost 20 years with The Arc covering topics related to criminal justice/victimization issues, FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder), and the ethics of genetic research. She has presented both nationally and internationally regarding criminal justice and disability issues and provided congressional testimony on the delivery of law enforcement services to people with developmental disabilities under Title II of the ADA. Ms. Davis served on SAMHSA’s (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) FASD Center for Excellence Expert Panel and currently serves as consultant for the Office for Victims of Crime Training and Technical Assistance Center (OVC TTAC), Vera Institute of Justice, and The Disability and Abuse Project. As a sexual abuse survivor who was shocked to discover the high rate of violence people with I/DD experience, she is passionate about ensuring victims with disabilities obtain justice and healing, and that criminal justice professionals are provided effective, on-going training to adequately serve people with disabilities - whether victim, suspect or offender.
  • Jessica S. Oppenheim, Esq. is the Director of the Criminal Justice Advocacy Program of The Arc of NJ, a statewide program which provides advocacy for people with developmental disabilities who become involved in the criminal justice system. Prior to joining The Arc of NJ in 2010, she was an Assistant Prosecutor in the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office and a Deputy Attorney General in the Division of Criminal Justice, Dept. of Law and Public Safety, from 1985 until 2010. In that capacity, she was Bureau Chief of the Prosecutor’s Supervision and Coordination Bureau, the unit which oversaw the 21 County Prosecutor’s Offices and 600 law enforcement agencies on behalf of the Attorney General. She also drafted and implemented the Attorney General’s Megan’s Law Guidelines, prosecuted Megan’s Law and domestic violence cases and provided training and policies and protocols for law enforcement agencies and prosecutors throughout the State on domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse, internal affairs policies, Megan’s Law and dealing with diverse populations. She has taught as an adjunct professor for the Paralegal Studies Program at Fairleigh Dickinson University. In addition to her Board membership for Women Aware, she is a board member for the NJ Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers.

Developing Positive Relationships

Date: Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Speakers Theresa Fears and Leigh Ann Davis will provide strategies that help people with I/DD develop the skills to understand and fully participate in healthy relationships. The speakers will also describe how to build skills to recognize when a relationship is unhealthy, exploitative, or abusive and provide concrete steps to take in those situations.

About the Speakers:

  • Theresa Fears MSW is a Sexual Abuse Preventionist at The Arc of Spokane. She has been providing Healthy Relationship classes to youth with intellectual disabilities for nine years. Theresa has been a presenter at local, state and national conferences on the topic of developing good relationships and abuse identification and prevention. Her work received the 2014 Visionary Voice Award from the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. In her spare time, Theresa spins yarn and crochets lots and lots of hats.
  • Leigh Ann Davis, M.S.S.W., M.P.A., is Director of Criminal Justice Initiatives and in that role oversees The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability®. She has worked in the area of disability and justice issues since 1994 when hired by The Arc of the United States to direct a Department of Justice project of national significance educating criminal justice professionals about ADA accommodations. Since that time, she has authored numerous publications (curricula, guidebooks, fact sheets, scholarly articles) during her almost 20 years with The Arc covering topics related to criminal justice/victimization issues, FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder), and the ethics of genetic research. She has presented both nationally and internationally regarding criminal justice and disability issues and provided congressional testimony on the delivery of law enforcement services to people with developmental disabilities under Title II of the ADA. Ms. Davis served on SAMHSA’s (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration) FASD Center for Excellence Expert Panel and currently serves as consultant for the Office for Victims of Crime Training and Technical Assistance Center (OVC TTAC), Vera Institute of Justice, and The Disability and Abuse Project. As a sexual abuse survivor who was shocked to discover the high rate of violence people with I/DD experience, she is passionate about ensuring victims with disabilities obtain justice and healing, and that criminal justice professionals are provided effective, on-going training to adequately serve people with disabilities - whether victim, suspect or offender.

Supporting People with I/DD to Identify Appropriate Housing

Date: Thursday October 16, 2016

There are many options for where adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) could live. Some people with I/DD may live independently, with other family members after they leave their parents’ home, or in a community-based setting with support. It is important to balance the wishes of the person with I/DD and the level of support needed when identifying housing options available in your community.

We will focus on how to explore housing options with an adult with I/DD. We will provide tips on important questions to ask the person with I/DD about where he or she wants to live when determining housing options. We will also provide guidance on how the family can work with the person with I/DD to determine supports needed to and housing preferences.

Panelists will include:

  • Diane Dressler, Senior Associate, Community Life Resources
  • Cathy Yadamec, Director of Training and Certification, The Council on Quality and Leadership

About the Speakers:

  • Diane L. Dressler has worked throughout her 35-year career to create and implement strategies supporting community inclusion for persons with disabilities. Her areas of expertise include supportive housing, transition, workforce development and person-centered practices. Ms. Dressler’s previous work experience includes statewide program management, including the coordination of housing and services, for the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Administration. She also served as Program Director for the Maryland Center for Developmental Disabilities at Kennedy Krieger Institute. Ms. Dressler is currently a Senior Associate with Community Life Resources (CLR), a consulting practice that provides technical assistance and training to government, service providers, people with disabilities and families on the creation and implementation of permanent supportive housing strategies. Current work includes assistance to the Maryland Department of Disabilities, the Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council and the Jubilee Association of Maryland. Ms. Dressler serves on the Board of Directors for the Maryland Association of Housing and Redevelopment Agencies (MAHRA), a chapter of the National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials (NAHRO), and chairs the Disability Advisory Committee. Ms. Dressler also represents the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD) on the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities Housing Task Force.
  • Cathy Yadamec is the Director of Training and Certification for CQL | The Council on Quality and Leadership. In this role, Cathy coordinates the training opportunities offered by CQL. She oversees the certification of Personal Outcome Measures® Interviewers and Trainers, and is responsible for developing new training opportunities often customizing it to meet the unique strengths and preferences of individual organizations. Cathy has experience within CQL and in private and state agencies supporting people with developmental disabilities to have better lives. Cathy has worked diligently to promote personal and organizational change to create a culture of responsiveness and focus on quality as defined by the person. In the 2000’s Cathy worked with CQL as a Project Manager and in the CMS Look-Behind Contract. For 3 years, Cathy served as the Manager of Quality Improvement/ Quality Enhancement for the Developmental Disability Administration in the District of Columbia, and then returned to CQL as the Project Manager for the Illinois Ligas Outreach Project. Cathy brings 35 years of well-rounded experience to CQL with strong project management, data, quality assurance and training skills. These skills are match by her ability to meld local experiences with a national perspective. She holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Education from the University of Missouri and a Masters of Arts degree in Education from the Lindenwood University. Her growing family is very important to her and she relishes the time she spends with her sisters, brothers and especially her great nieces and nephews. She enjoys hiking and spending time wandering around the world.

Future Planning for People with Dual Diagnoses of I/DD and Mental Health Needs: Strategies and Challenges

Date: Tuesday June 21, 2016

Creating a future plan - a guide for a person to lead a good life as independently as possible – is important for all people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). Please join us for a panel discussion on strategies that people with dual diagnoses of I/DD and mental health needs and their family members can use to create future plans that build on the individual’s strengths, likes, and dislikes.

We will identify challenges in planning for people with dual diagnoses and explore how to identify and implement strategies to provide the greatest opportunity for independence and growth for each individual, as well as ways to support people through the grief and loss that comes with transitions.

Panelists will include:

  • Joan Beasley, PhD, Director of the Center for START Services, Research Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire Institute on Disability UCED
  • Marisa Brown, MSN, RN, Research Instructor, Center for Child and Human Development, Georgetown University
  • Robert J. Fletcher, DSW, ACSW, CEO and Founder, National Association for the Dually Diagnosed
  • Karyn Harvey, PhD, Assistant Executive Director of Quality Support, The Arc Baltimore

About the Speakers:

  • Joan B. Beasley, Ph.D., is a licensed mental health counselor and holds a Ph.D. in Social Policy from the Heller School at Brandeis University. Dr. Beasley has worked to promote the development of effective services for people with disabilities and their families for more than 30 years, and is the recipient of the 2010 Frank J. Menolascino Award for Excellence from the NADD. She is the author and co-founder of the START program, first developed in 1989.
  • Marisa C. Brown, MSN, RN, is a research instructor in the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development, University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCDD) in Washington, D.C. She has been associated with Georgetown University for the past 33 years serving in many capacities. She is an advanced nurse practitioner specializing in the health care of individuals with developmental disabilities, and has over 30 years of experience in this specialty. For the past 10 years she has directed the DC Developmental Disabilities Health Initiative, an effort aimed at improving health care quality and access for adults with intellectual disabilities. She recently completed a training course on dementia and intellectual disabilities from the National Task Group on Dementia and is authorized to use their curriculum. As the parent of a young adult with autism spectrum disorder, she is particularly interested in advocacy for services to support community integration and independence.
  • Robert J. Fletcher, DSW, ACSW, is the founder and CEO of the National Association for the Dually Diagnosed and has more than 35 years of clinical experience in providing individual, group, and family psychotherapy for persons with a dual diagnosis. He is the author or editor of several books in the field, including Therapy Approaches for Persons with Mental Retardation, and is the chief editor of the Diagnostic Manual–Intellectual Disability. He lives in Kingston, New York.
  • Karyn Harvey, Ph.D., has worked as a psychologist for over 25 years. She is currently the Assistant Executive Director of Quality Support at The Arc Baltimore, where she oversees psychology, nursing, training and quality assurance. Karyn has written two books on working with individuals with Intellectual Disabilities, one focused on clinical intervention and the other on trauma and programmatic issues. Karyn also teaches a graduate class in the psychology of trauma at The University of Baltimore.

What’s Next: The ABLE Act in 2016

Date: March 15, 2016 and March 17, 2016

Since the passage of the Achieving a Better Life Experience (ABLE) Act, states have been enacting enabling legislation, Congress has amended the law, and federal agencies have been promulgating regulations and issuing guidance.

With these latest developments in mind, The Center for Future Planning is hosting two webinars during March to review the basics of the ABLE Act, discuss these developments, and explore what will come next.

  • Tuesday, March 15, 2016: Marty Ford, Senior Executive Officer for Public Policy at The Arc, will review the basics of the ABLE Act; the recent IRS and SSA decisions and their implications for chapter staff of The Arc and other disability professionals; state program launch information; and major differences between ABLE accounts and specials needs trusts (SNTs).
    The target audience is staff members at chapters of The Arc and other disability professionals.
  • Thursday, March 17, 2016 Marty Ford will be joined by Samantha Crane, Legal Director and Director of Public Policy, Autistic Self Advocacy Network (ASAN). These two experts on the ABLE Act will explore the basics of the ABLE Act; IRS/SSA’s recent decisions and their implications for people with I/DD and their families; state program launch information; as well as the major differences between ABLE accounts and special needs trusts (SNTs).
    The target audience is family members and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

About the Speakers:

  • Marty Ford, Senior Executive Officer, Public Policy Office, has over 30 years of experience in federal public policy issues affecting people with disabilities. She has represented The Arc on Capitol Hill and in the federal agencies on issues including long term services and supports (including Medicaid), the Supplemental Security Income program, and Social Security disability issues. Ms. Ford served three years as Chairperson of the Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities (CCD), a coalition of over 100 national organizations, and currently serves as Co-Chair of the CCD Task Force on Financial Security. Ms. Ford has testified numerous times before Congress, including before the House Ways and Means Committee and its Subcommittees, Subcommittees of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees and House Budget Committee, and the Senate Finance Committee. Ms. Ford is currently the Vice-Chair of the Advance CLASS Board of Directors and serves on the Board of the National Academy of Social Insurance. She has served on the American Bar Association’s Commission on Law and Aging and continues to serve as its disability liaison. She received her J.D. from the George Washington University National Law Center; M.S. in Communications Design from Pratt Institute; and B.A. from the University of Virginia.
  • Samantha Crane, Legal Director and Director of Public Policy at ASAN’s national office, focuses on promoting full inclusion of people with disabilities in the community, including access to competitive integrated employment and community-based supports and services. She has written numerous resources on self-determination for people with developmental disabilities and access to decision-making supports in financial, healthcare, and other contexts. A graduate of Harvard Law School, Samantha previously served as staff attorney at the Bazelon Center of Mental Health Law, focusing on enforcing the right to community integration as established by the Supreme Court in Olmstead v. L.C., and as an associate at the litigation firm Quinn Emanuel Urquhart, & Sullivan, L.L.P., where she focused on patent and securities litigation.

March 15, 2016: For chapter staff and other disability professionals


March 17, 2016: For people with I/DD and family members


Breaking Up is Hard to Do: Divorce and Families that Include a Child with I/DD

Date: January 13, 2016

Family disruption is an inherent part of divorce. When a family member with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) is involved, the complexities can increase. Divorce often impacts public benefits, creates additional expenses, and complicates family dynamics.

Join us for to hear insights from Attorney Craig Reaves and Psychologist Dr. Rebecca Resnik about the factors families should consider and the steps they should take when parents of a son or daughter with I/DD are considering divorce, going through a divorce, and continuing their lives after divorce.

About the Speakers:

  • Rebecca Resnik has earned a Doctor of Psychology from The George Washington University. She also holds a Master of Education in Special Education from the The University of Maryland at College Park, as well as a Bachelor of Science, Special Education (Cum Laude and with Honors). Dr. Resnik completed her psychology internship training in Pediatric Psychology and Neuropsychology at Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital. Her Post Doctoral Residency in Psychological Assessment was completed at Mindwell Psychology in Virginia. Dr. Resnik is a Licensed Psychologist in the state of Maryland. Dr. Resnik has served as a voting member of the Maryland Psychological Association’s (MPA) Board of Directors, Maryland Psychological Association since 2011. She has been recognized for leadership for her service to MPA. Dr. Resnik is also a member of the GTLD Network, Exceptional Minds (X-Minds), Learning Disabilities Association of Montgomery County, and Women Business Owners of Montgomery County. Her research interests include applications of computational linguistics in psychology. She was co-organizer of the first Computational Linguistics and Clinical Psychology workshop held at the Association for Computational Linguistic’s annual international conference, 2014. She continues to be a reviewer for the Workshop (now in its 3rd year).
  • Craig Reaves received a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis in Political Science from the University of Kansas in 1975. He received a Juris Doctor (law degree) from the University of Kansas School of Law in 1978. He received the CLU (Chartered Life Underwriter) designation in 1977 and the ChFC (Chartered Financial Consultant) designation in 1984 from the American College in Bryn Mawr Pennsylvania. He received the CELA (Certified Elder Law Attorney) designation from the National Elder Law Foundation in 1995. Mr. Reaves is a past President of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA). He is a Fellow of NAELA and a Fellow of the American College of Trust & Estate Counsel (ACTEC). He was a founding director and the second president of the Missouri Chapter of NAELA, and has been a member of the Kansas Chapter since it was formed. Mr. Reaves is an Adjunct Professor of Law at both the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Law and also at the University of Kansas School of Law. He teaches an Elder Law course at both of these law schools.

Including Social Connections and Recreational Activities in Future Plans

Date: December 15, 2015

Building relationships and participating in community activities are important parts of all of our lives.

Join The Arc's Center for Future Planning to learn how you can support people with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families to create a future plan that includes opportunities for growing and supporting the development of social connections and recreational activities throughout a lifetime.

About the Speakers:

  • Al Condeluci is a lifelong resident of Pittsburgh PA, USA. He received his masters and doctorate degrees at the University of Pittsburgh and for the past 42 years has served as CEO of CLASS, a full service nonprofit organization supporting people with disabilities; holding faculty appointments with the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences and School of Social Work. His books, Interdependence (1991, 1995), Beyond Difference (1996), Cultural Shifting (2002), Advocacy for Change (2004), Together is Better (2008), Social Capital (2014) and the Macro Change Handbook (2015) have been used around the world.
  • Dee Duncan is the Founder and Executive Director of New Directions Travel, which provides travel and holiday vacations for people with developmental disabilities. She founded the New Directions organization in 1985 and continues to inspire others and dedicate her efforts to accomplishing their mission. New Directions travel was named Nonprofit of the Year for 2015 by the Mayor’s office in Santa Barbara. Dee has worked with people with developmental disabilities since 1977. She earned a BS in Psychology from the University of California at Santa Barbara.
  • Regina Watts is the Activities Program Director at The Point/The Arc of Northern Kentucky where she provides socialization experiences for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. She started in the disabilities filed over 40 years ago as a volunteer at a summer program. While Regina has seen many twists and turns in her career, she has always found herself returning to the field. She enjoys helping individuals turn their dreams into reality by accomplishing their different goals.

Getting There: Including Transportation in a Future Plan

Date: November 17, 2015

Access to reliable, affordable and safe transportation promotes independent, community living for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). People with I/DD can receive training on how to use public transportation to get to and from work, to visit friends and family, and participate in community activities. A future plan should consider how a person with I/DD will access public transportation and what training will be needed to learn to use it. Join The Arc’s Center for Future Planning® to learn more about accessible transportation and travel training.

Our presenters will include Donna Smith, Director of Training for Easter Seals Project ACTION, and Robyn Bernardy, Director of Travel Training for Medical Transportation Management.

About the Speakers:

  • Julie Dupree is a Training and Technical Assistance Specialist for Easter Seals Transportation Group in Washington, D.C. She promotes accessible community transportation strategies through a variety of initiatives including the National Center for Mobility Management, where she facilitates coordination and provides customized training to communities and individuals throughout the United States. She also facilitates Easter Seals Project Action Consulting’s three-day Introduction to Travel Training workshop in communities across the country. Prior to joining Easter Seals, Julie was the Travel Training Program Manager for Central Maryland Regional Transit, where she built community partnerships that promoted safe and independent travel, coordination and bus stop accessibility. Julie got her start in the disability field by working as a Vocational Counselor for The Arc of Howard County in Ellicott City, Maryland.
  • Robyn Bernardy is the Director of Travel Training for Medical Transportation Management (MTM); she oversees the company’s nationwide travel training operations. In particular, Robyn provides direct oversight for MTM’s Our On the Move assessment and travel training activities in the District of Columbia, Minnesota, Houston, Wisconsin, WMATA, KCATA, and PRTC contracts. Her Masters of Social Work degree has helped tailor her expertise in working with older adults and individuals with disabilities. For the past twelve years, Robyn has worked in a variety of settings, all focused on increasing the independence of individuals with disabilities.

Planning for a Future in the Workforce: Jobs, Skills, and Supports

Date: October 21, 2015

Join the Center for Future Planning® for a panel discussion on employment, job skills, and planning for the future of a person with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The panel will discuss topics including job coaching and support, developing skills and fostering job growth, requesting job accommodations, as well as how to deal with new supervisors and co-workers and changes in the job itself.

Our panelists will include John Kramer of the Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston, Anne Roehl of the University of Minnesota’s Institute on Community Integration, and Melanie Whetzel of the Job Accommodation Network (JAN). Amie Lulinski, The Arc’s Director of Research and Evaluation will moderate the panel.

About the Speakers:

  • John Kramer earned his PhD in disability studies from the University of Illinois at Chicago and joined the Institute for Community Inclusion in 2008. He has focused extensively on employment work and has worked on a range of projects that include co-founding the Massachusetts Sibling Support Network (MSSN) and Supporting Illinois Brothers and Sisters. John was awarded a Switzer research fellowship from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research to investigate the role that siblings play in supporting employment for people with Intellectual and developmental disabilities.
  • Anne Roehl joined the University of Minnesota’s Institute on Community Integration (ICI) in 2012, to work with Person Centered Thinking and Planning initiatives. Before joining the University, she worked in a variety of settings supporting individuals and families impacted by disabilities. Her education focused on disability studies, however, she’ll tell you she’s learned the most from the people she’s served and in her role as “Mom” to a young son with Autism.
  • Melanie Whetzel is a lead consultant at JAN who joined the Cognitive / Neurological Team in February 2008. She has a fourteen year history of teaching and advocating for students with disabilities in the public school system. Melanie holds a Master of Arts degree in Special Education, a Bachelor of Arts degree in English, most recently completed a graduate certification in Career Planning and Placement for Youth in Transition, and became a certified brain injury specialist in 2015.

Supported Decision-Making: What Is It and What Do You Need to Know to Get Started?

Date: Sept 10, 2015

We all make decisions every day. People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) often seek guidance from trusted family and friends to help with making some daily and major life decisions. These decisions can range from making simple purchases to managing a budget to talking to a healthcare provider about medical care. Supported Decision-Making is a way people can make their own decisions and stay in charge of their lives, while receiving any help they need to do so.

Join The Arc’s Center for Future Planning® to learn more about supported decision-making and how people with I/DD are using supports to live good and independent lives.

Speakers: Tina Campanella will discuss the range of support that a person may receive, stories and examples of how these supports have been carried out successfully, challenges people have faced in setting up decision-making supports, and what you need to know to help the person with I/DD in your life set up decision-making supports. Our second speaker, Bonnie Nelson, will discuss the work The Arc of North Carolina is doing to promote supported decision-making.

About the Speakers:

  • Tina Campanella currently serves as the Chief Executive officer of Quality Trust, which she has established as a strong, independent and effective advocacy organization in DC for residents with developmental disabilities and their families. Tina has over 35 years of experience working with children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. She has also worked in variety of areas in her field including systems change, leadership and management, advocacy and staff development. Tina is also a member of the Leadership Greater Washington Class of 2010 and was appointed by the Mayor of the District of Columbia to chair the Developmental Disabilities Council in 2010.
  • Bonnie Nelson currently serves as the State Restoration Project Manager at The Arc of North Carolina. Bonnie spent 24 years as the Executive Directory of Rockingham County Council on MR and has extensive experience in her field. Bonnie has served as a Board Member for The Arc and LIFEguardianship Council for 40 years. She also has a variety of practice experience which includes program development, community outreach, and program evaluation. Bonnie graduated from Duke University with a BS in History and Social Studies.

SibTips Webinar: Understanding the Alphabet Soup of Future Planning

Date: Aug 11, 2015

As siblings play a larger role in the lives of their brothers or sisters with I/DD, they often times are confused by the new set of terms and acronyms they need to learn to navigate the service system. Join The Arc’s Center for Future Planning® and the Sibling Leadership Network for a webinar sharing practical tips that siblings need to support their brother or sister with I/DD as they plan for the future.

Speakers Cynthia R. Haddad and Alex Nadworny will discuss aspects of the caregiver relationship you should understand such as the history of services your sibling has received, your sibling’s support needs, and all family members’ wishes for the future. The speakers will also provide tips on how to prepare to support your brother or sister with I/DD to navigate the service system.


“Being With” People with I/DD Experiencing Grief and Loss

Date: July 29, 2015

Loss is an unavoidable part of living, and grief is the process that helps us heal from a loss. Historically, it was believed that people with intellectual disabilities lacked the cognitive abilities to feel or express grief-related thoughts and feelings. However, recent research has shown that people with intellectual disabilities should be included in the bereavement process and their losses should be acknowledged.

Presenters will dispel these past misconceptions by sharing a new view of grief. This perspective includes current best practices for people with intellectual disabilities and important strategies to assist administrators, staff, families, and self-advocates in supporting grieving individuals.

Through story telling, examples of successful grief interventions, and learning about partnerships such as hospice, participants will leave the session feeling competent and comfortable using the simple techniques of “being with” individuals who are grieving the loss of others or thinking about their own mortality.


Future Planning Stories from Self-Advocates: Successes, Challenges, and How to Make Your Voice Heard

Date: June 16, 2015

Join us to hear self-advocates Savannah Logsdon-Breakstone, Nicole LeBlanc, and Amy Goodman speak about the successes and challenges they have had in future planning. Hear about how they have planned for success, how they have addressed challenges in planning, and what skills they have learned to make their voices heard.


Housing 101: Exploring the Options

Date: May 19, 2015

There are many types of places for where adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD ) could live in the community. It’s important to determine the level of support needed by the person with I/DD when exploring the housing options available in your community. One size does not fit all so it’s never too early to get started on understanding the different housing options.

In this webinar, Lisa Sloane and Diane Dressler discuss the housing options available to people with I/DD and share what to keep in mind when identifying the best fit for the person with I/DD. Speakers will also discuss how to navigate the challenges of assessing housing services.


The Family: Aging and Disability

Date: April 13, 2015

This webinar focuses on supports and services for older caregivers and aging adults with I/DD. Speakers from the National Council on Aging and the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging discuss the National Family Caregiver Support Program and provide a brief overview of the Older Americans Act. These experts also discuss the importance of building relationships with the Area Agencies on Aging, core services offered, and how to access these services.


Building Bridges: Working with Faith Communities to Support People with I/DD

Date: March 11, 2015

Clergy and other faith leaders often play an important role in the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families. Faith communities can support people with I/DD to build community connections and to provide spiritual support.

In this webinar, Bill Gaventa and Michelle Reynolds share tools and resources that faith leaders can use to support families as they plan for the future. Speakers also discuss how staff at chapters of The Arc and other members of the disability community can work with faith communities to reach out to families that are not connected to the disability service system.


What’s Next: The ABLE Act and Tax Tips

Date: February 10, 2015

Recently, President Obama signed the Achieving a Better Life Experience (“ABLE”) Act into law. The ABLE Act creates a new option for some people with disabilities to save for the future, while protecting eligibility for public benefits.

During the first part of this webinar, we will offer more information about ABLE accounts by addressing frequently-asked questions relating to requirements, eligibility, qualifying expenses and more.

During the second half of this webinar, Bernard Krooks, an experienced attorney, will provide useful tips to help families prepare for the upcoming tax season.


Siblings and Future Planning

Date: January 13, 2015

Siblings of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) often take on a larger role once their parents are no longer able to provide support to their brother or sister. In this webinar, you will hear from two siblings of people with I/DD as they share their perspectives on sibling support:

  • Katie Arnold discusses the sibling role in future planning and provides tips on how to get the conversation started when parents or other caregivers are reluctant to discuss the future.
  • Kitty Porterfield shares insight on “The Club Sandwich Generation.” This is a term that refers to adult siblings juggling the responsibilities of providing care to their aging parents and raising their own children, while also supporting their brother or sister with I/DD. She also addresses the importance of self-care and how to navigate long-distance sibling relationships.

First Steps in Future Planning: Expressing Future Wishes and Financial Planning

Date: December 10, 2014

Where do we start? That’s often a question adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families ask after they have recognized the importance of future planning. Expressing future wishes and financial planning are first steps in creating a plan for the future that will allow for a person with I/DD to live as independently as possible.

In this webinar, you will hear from Hye Kyong Jeong of The Arc of King County, a chapter that is doing excellent work in helping families plan for the future. Learn about the important elements that families may want to include as they document future wishes. Andy Hook, an attorney experienced in special needs planning, provides an overview of financial planning and discuss the importance of establishing a special needs trusts.


The Importance of Future Planning: Supporting Aging Caregivers and Individuals with I/DD

Date: November 11, 2014

In this webinar, we provide an overview about the Center for Future Planning® and its activities to encourage families and adults with I/DD who do not have a plan in place for the future. You have the opportunity to hear from leading experts:

  • Tamar Heller, Director of the Institute on Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois at Chicago, who provides an overview on person-centered future planning and how it benefits individuals with I/DD and their families.
  • Nancy Murray, President of The Arc of Greater Pittsburgh, who addresses the challenges that disability organizations face when supporting families with aging caregivers.