Special Needs Trusts

Betty and Lauren discuss the importance of special needs trusts.

People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) and their families often must find a way to save without losing public benefits that a person with IDD receives. Special needs trusts are one tool that can be used to help people pay for the things that they may need and want in their lives.

Plain Language

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Why should we consider getting a special needs trust?

By using a special needs trust, people with IDD and families can ensure that there is ongoing financial support for the things people with IDD need and want, even after parents or caregivers have passed away.

Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) also have limits on how much a person may earn and how much they may have in assets. If a person goes over those income or asset limits, he or she may lose those benefits and vital services may stop. Special needs trusts are legal tools that can help manage funds without losing these benefits.

Families should consider how special needs trusts fit into their plan to finance the future and whether this is the right way for the family to save. Some families may decide to create both a special needs trust and an ABLE account. Other families may use only one.

What can a special needs trust pay for?

Special needs trusts are supposed to be used to purchase goods and services not covered by public benefits. Some examples are:

What options are there for a special needs trust?

How do we fund a trust?

A trust can be funded in two ways:

You may be able to set up a special needs trust, especially for the proceeds of a life insurance policy or a will, before you have the money to fund it. Once the funds are available, they can be put into the trust. Make sure anyone who wants to leave a person with IDD money in a will understands that placing the funds into a special needs trust rather than giving them to the person directly may help protect their public benefits.

For a trust to qualify as a special needs trust and protect a person’s public benefits, the trust must be set up and funded properly. Therefore, it’s important to work with an attorney who understands special needs trusts when figuring out what will work for your family. You can find an attorney near you in our online Resource Directory.